Notable statements from the 2011-2012 KPMG Global BCM Program Benchmarking Study

  • The fact that 31% of respondents felt they had met their RTO during a disruption, when 85%
    are using exercises, indicates there is room to improve the quality of exercises. ~ED Mately,
    Director, Advisory Services, KPMG LLP
  • It is interesting that reputation as a program driver has increased from 14% to 40% in the last
    four years. I believe this is the direct result of the pervasiveness of social media & its impact on
    public perception.
  • Almost 85% of the respondents state that their business continuity program is primarily
    implemented for continuity of operations, which emphasizes the acknowledgement of
    corporate responsibility and ownership to institutionalize this continuity into business
    portfolios.
  • It appears that the business continuity function is getting better defined, is reporting at a higher
    level and functional substantiation is based on value to the business. If we want to raise the
    profile of BCM and get executive-level buy-in, then we need to measure the value contribution
    of BCM programs not just program performance.
  • Many organizations’ IT recovery strategies are undergoing change, namely internal software
    and hardware solutions (43%), combination internal and external solutions (36%), and external
    hardware and software solutions (23%). On average, 3.8% of IT budgets go to disaster recovery
    capabilities.
  • An organization’s reputation can be ruined in minutes if not handled appropriately. That is why
    it is essential to have social media plans incorporated as part of an overall crisis management
    response.
  • Executive sponsorship, funding and other metrics are important considerations for all
    organizations. One way we can further develop BCM programs is to increase collaboration
    across all industries.

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